She Said

In the beginning act of the movie “The Princess Bride”, whenever Wesley says “as you wish”, Buttercup begins to understand that what he means is “I love you”. This works so well (imo) because it is a truth played out in life. The pursuit of a mate has not changed much over time. In a society where we choose our mates, we typically take it cautiously, looking for signs of reciprocation before being “completely” honest. It just saves a lot of awkwardness.
Or was that just me?
My mother tells me the story of how my grandmother was essentially “kidnapped” into marrying, at the hands of a powerful man in her South American country. Grandmother eventually fled to this country with her children. My mom was sixteen years old at that time. It’s from her that I own a significant amount of Inca heritage in my DNA.
For this song, I thought back to the early part of a budding friendship that ultimately became a marriage. We both went slow and weren’t actually “looking”. But there is a point when you know something is forming that is stronger than your resistance. You can give in to it, or you can fight it.
This song is inspired from the specific moment when we first kissed and embraced. We were standing on Del Amo Boulevard by her ’66 Mustang. I told her “I like you. A lot. Don’t leave.” Everything goes in slow motion when you open up. A thousand fears race through your head, but you’re done with pretending something isn’t there. A short, silent eternity passed “waiting” for one another to make the first move and in the end, it was mutual, and very passionate.
Undoubtedly, that was a romantic encounter. But as I wrote last month for Valentine’s Day, romance within the context of practicing love takes on more powerful meaning as time goes by. (I may have not stated all of that, but that’s what I meant)
That young love has long gone away and made way for the practiced type that requires more than words and kisses. This song includes both of those thoughts and wishes.

She Said

I will never leave you 
And I’ll love you forever
I will never leave you 
And I’ll love you forever

If we have lunch together
It don’t mean nuthin’
Don’t mean a thing
You don’t need to call me
And we’ll just split the bill 

I will never leave you 
And I’ll love you forever
I will never leave you 
And I’ll love you forever

Tell me ’bout the books you read
Though I’m not, much of a reader
Just want to hear your voice
To imagine the places you go

I will never leave you 
And I’ll love you forever
I will never leave you 
And I’ll love you forever

Can I walk you to your car
And tell you how much I really like you
If I kiss you on the street
Will you run away from me

She said
Never say never
And forever is a long time
She said
Never say never
And forever is a long time
She said

Hear it here:

She Said – from Mark Wade on Vimeo.


Photograph “A Pair” – Two phoebe during spring rituals.



“A” For Effort

My wife Robin is a library tech at two elementary schools. She takes her job seriously, knows all the books and matches readers to these books with great precision. It is a gift and a labor of love for her.
Recently, while a third grade class was visiting her library and checking out books, a boy asked “do you have the book The Human Body?” Robin contemplated a moment …”yes we have it. You need to ask your teacher if it is appropriate for your reading level”.
The lad inquired his teacher and she answered with an absolute “no”. This transaction did not escape notice of another student in the class. It became evident that the “forbidden” book piqued her interest.
A little later, the lass approached Robin with great confidence and with adult eloquence asked “where do I find the book The Human Body?” After twenty-plus years of dealing with thousands of elementary school-aged children, Robin’s intuition kicked in. She understands that reinforcing a manipulative action should never be rewarded.
Robin looked her square in the eyes. At that point they both knew this little sprite was aware that the teacher said “no” earlier. “Divide and conquer” is a ploy the eight-year-old has likely used very successfully in her short life, and now she was testing yet another adult with it.
“We have the book, but it it is not age appropriate for you”, Robin answered. The little girl’s determination drove the question “why”.
Robin said, “If you read it you may have questions for your parents. I’m not sure your parents are ready to have that conversation with you yet.”
The gears quickly turned in the little girl’s head. “What conversation?”, her tone of voice was turning condescending. “About where babies come from”, Robin chimed.
“Oh, THAT conversation” the eight-year old stated with adult-like arrogance. “I’ve had THAT conversation with them and I KNOW where babies come from.
They come from God!”
“Right. Now go ask your teacher if the book is age appropriate”, Robin motioned to the other side of the room.
And that was that.