No Reserves

Spent a morning near “dog beach” – Ocean Beach, CA.

I had visited earlier in the year to familiarize myself with a new lens.
This location empties into the ocean. Channels of rock and concrete have been constructed to direct water flow.
The channels are essentially at the end of the San Diego River.
The real estate there is under constant human pressure, but the sand bars are rich with bird life.

Bridge work under current construction, just west of my location

I noticed a sign on the south bank that indicated that parts of the channel are considered a reserve and no boat traffic is allowed. It’s interesting that a Google search does not include this area as “wildlife reserve.”
The morning was terrible for light as-per-usual. Morning cloud cover made for haze and high ISO for my little apsc camera. When this happens, you just make the adjustments and move forward. Here is what I found:

Yellow crowned night heron with crab. (soft focus/low light)
Breaching Mullet
Pelican
Little Blue Heron
Sandpipers
Apparently, this hawk had been banded. (soft focus)
Tern catches small mullet
The other terns wanted some of that catch
Godwit, curlew

What’s more interesting is that the “reserve” has no sandbars breaching the surface. When I inspected the area, there was little wildlife activity.
I’m hoping my next trek will have some better lighting.

See you!

9 Comments

    1. thank you, I noticed some patterns to their behavior, so trained focus in the area they were breaching
      Initially they were jumping on the south side of the channel so I headed over there since I had never tried that side.
      By the time I set up, they were breaching the north side. Figures.

      Liked by 2 people

    1. Yes! I suck at it as well. I’ve spent the last 14 years trying to master the multiple exposure impression. It became an obsession void of most details. I was telling Alex Kunz that this project has yielded some 15k images. The majority of those images are useless within the “bird photography” paradigm/philosophy. It is a healthy challenge.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. At least you spent 14 years doing something different. One reason why I don’t try more for birds is that it’s repetitive and there plenty of people who are better equipped than I am and can dot it better than me. It’s more about technical expertise than art. I wold probably feel different if I lived somewhere I could capture rarely seen birds, maybe I would photograph them for profit.

        Liked by 1 person

        1. Yes! Why would I make something that has been done ad nauseam? What is the hope in using a Holga lens? Is it not the application of light values arranged on the frame that produces the message/emotive value of an image? I have made many many bird photographs over the years, most of which are not representational. Perhaps this new venture will tweak what I have started. The last few months have been painstakingly boring! There is no telling what this new arrow in my quiver will render. That is why I love photography. It is a joy.
          Have you considered the true power of controlling light? Stack many filters in front of the lens, consider all of the information in front of you, estimate all light values. Then point your lens at several light sources to create a dreamscape. It is not repeatable…ever.
          sorry… I’ll be quiet
          Western Sunset

          Like

  1. Well, I’d say for a non-bird photographer, you’ve got quite the “catch” during your outing! Very nice collection of images. Also, did you consider buying a lottery ticket when you managed to get that photo of the fish jumping out of the water? 😉 That kind of luck doesn’t seem to come often…

    Liked by 1 person

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